New History Talk Programme (May 2014 – March 2015) at Kent History & Library Centre, Maidstone

???????????????????????????????The Kent History & Library Centre in Maidstone is a hub for historical expertise and this  newly released series of talks is bound to prove popular.  All talks are on a Thursday and will start at 6.30pm. Entry is £3.00 and you can book your seat by calling 03000 413131 or emailing historyandlibrarycentre@kent.gov.uk

Hope to see you there!

8 May 2014- ‘The Curious Rural Revolt’: Kentish tithe wars in the 1930’s -John Bulaitis from Canterbury Christ Church University

Kent was a leading player in this important episode of 20th century history which is incredibly now almost forgotten.

12 June 2014 – The wedding journey of Charles 1 and Henrietta Maria through Kent: a diplomatic rumpus – Sara Wolfson – Canterbury Christ Church University

In June 1625, the newly weds made their way from Dover to London, feted by the crowds. But this was one royal procession that didn’t go like clockwork.

17 July 2014 – George Austen’s Tonbridge – Mark Ballard – Tower Hamlets Local History Library & Archives

Tonbridge was the home town of the Rev. George Austen (1731-1805), father of Jane Austen the famous novelist. This talk draws on the archives held at the Kent History & Library Centre to describe how the family came to live there, and the buildings that George knew, several of which are still standing.

7 August – The British & Belgian shared experience of World War 1 – Andrew Morgan – Dover Transport Museum; The Shornecliffe Trust

Andrew acted as historical advisor on the film The First and the Last, a commission by the Belgian tourist board that is a must-see in this centenary year of the invasion of their country.

21 August – The Thompson brothers: a story of the First World War – Liz Finn – Kent History & Library Centre

Liz traces the extraordinary story of the three brothers, immortalised in a stunning photograph from the Essenhigh Corke collection.

11 September – The Great War and Great Chart – Emma Hanna – University of Greenwich

Emma, an academic historian, reports her research on the letters sent by soldiers and sailors in response to letters and parcels sent to them from Great Chart. This is one of the most important archives held at the Kent History & Library Centre.

25 September – Union and Workhouse Records – Deborah Collins – Independent Researcher

Deborah, the author of a very useful website on the subject, will describe the wealth of documentation existing in the Kent archives and explain its value to family historians.

9 October – Surviving the Western Front: Regimental identity and officer-man relations in the Buffs, 1914-1918 – Mark Connelly – University of Kent.

You will be enthused and inspired, as well as informed, in this talk by the Professor of Modern British Military History.

23 October – Literacy and Book Ownership in Seventeenth Century Faversham – Linda Taylor – Independent Researcher

Linda, an alumnus of the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of Kent, explains book ownership, literacy and education in East Kent 350 years ago using will inventories and other archives from the Kent History & Library Centre.

20 November 2014 – ‘It it a pity what bad men could be turned inside out sometimes’: Victorian Scandal on the Kent coast – Carolyn Oulton – International Centre for Victorian Women Writers

Carolyn’s talk will draw on and sum up the exhibition “Victorian Women at the Seaside”, due to tour some Kent seaside libraries in the summer and autumn of this year’

5 March 2015 – Why does Faversham have its Magna Carta? – Peter Tann – Kent Archaeological Society

An examination of one of Kent’s most important documents set in the context of Faversham’s surviving medieval charters.

Many thanks to the Kent History & Library Centre for allowing me to reproduce their programme here and don’t forget you can book your tickets in advance by calling 03000 413131 or by emailing historyandlibrarycentre@kent.gov.uk

Rachael

 

 

 

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